Hispanic Heritage Month

Mercy Soly, Editor

Annually, the days of Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 are marked as an American national observance to honor and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Initially originating as only one week in 1968, it was preserved in 1988 as 30 calendar days through an action by former President Ronald Reagan.
“Hispanic Heritage Month is really cool,” junior Kaycee Stapleton said. “I think it brings together all the Spanish-speaking countries for this month, and it allows people outside of those countries to learn about Hispanic culture.”
Hispanic Heritage Month recognizes the impact Hispanic and Latin Americans whose backgrounds fall under Spanish-speaking Latin American countries such as El Salvador, Belize, Mexico, and the parts they played, and continue to participate in, throughout American History.
“In theory, I think it is a great thing. I do like the idea of celebrating different heritage months and cultures, but I don’t think that Hispanic month should be relegated to only one month and I think it’s something we should celebrate all the time,” junior Sebastian Rios said.
The month begins with the celebration of the independence of Mexico, Chile and Belize from Spain on Sept. 16, Sept. 18 and Sept. 21. These are followed by independence days of more countries all month long.
“I feel proud of being a part of the Hispanic Community in Loudoun County, because since there are not many Hispanics, I know I am viewed differently but I am not afraid of showing the real me and of showing my culture,” Senior Lupita Arellano said.
Loudoun County’s demographic, as of 2019, rounded to about 13.9% Hispanic, whereas the White (Non-Hispanic) population was almost triple that. As a result, Loudoun County holds the rating of number 18 out of 25 of the most diverse counties in the state of Virginia according to Niche.
“I remember being one of maybe five people in my entire fifth-grade class of which there were four classes in general that were Hispanic,” Stapleton said. “That number has surely now changed, but I never really felt that community of Hispanic/Latina/Latinx in school.”
The difference in diversity is more prominent between Loudoun County’s Eastern and Western divisions as well, where Eastern Loudoun holds much more diversity as a whole compared to the Western population.
“The eastern side is closer to the city and there are more job opportunities available there,” Stapleton said. “And I mean, in a perfect world, diversity would be equal on both sides of Loudoun, and all of Viginia.”
In the west, Loudoun Valley High School’s racial population is 78% white, second to Woodgrove High School being 81.1%.
Despite the Loudoun County Hispanic population in the county being minimal, the county has worked to make sure Annually, the days of Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 are marked as an American national observance to honor and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Initially originating as only one week in 1968, it was preserved in 1988 as 30 calendar days through an action by former President Ronald Reagan.
“Hispanic Heritage Month is really cool,” junior Kaycee Stapleton said. “I think it brings together all the Spanish-speaking countries for this month, and it allows people outside of those countries to learn about Hispanic culture.”
Hispanic Heritage Month recognizes the impact Hispanic and Latin Americans whose backgrounds fall under Spanish-speaking Latin American countries such as El Salvador, Belize, Mexico, and the parts they played, and continue to participate in, throughout American History.
“In theory, I think it is a great thing. I do like the idea of celebrating different heritage months and cultures, but I don’t think that Hispanic month should be relegated to only one month and I think it’s something we should celebrate all the time,” junior Sebastian Rios said.
The month begins with the celebration of the independence of Mexico, Chile and Belize from Spain on Sept. 16, Sept. 18 and Sept. 21. These are followed by independence days of more countries all month long.
“I feel proud of being a part of the Hispanic Community in Loudoun County, because since there are not many Hispanics, I know I am viewed differently but I am not afraid of showing the real me and of showing my culture,” Senior Lupita Arellano said.
Loudoun County’s demographic, as of 2019, rounded to about 13.9% Hispanic, whereas the White (Non-Hispanic) population was almost triple that. As a result, Loudoun County holds the rating of number 18 out of 25 of the most diverse counties in the state of Virginia according to Niche.
“I remember being one of maybe five people in my entire fifth-grade class of which there were four classes in general that were Hispanic,” Stapleton said. “That number has surely now changed, but I never really felt that community of Hispanic/Latina/Latinx in school.”
The difference in diversity is more prominent between Loudoun County’s Eastern and Western divisions as well, where Eastern Loudoun holds much more diversity as a whole compared to the Western population.
“The eastern side is closer to the city and there are more job opportunities available there,” Stapleton said. “And I mean, in a perfect world, diversity would be equal on both sides of Loudoun, and all of Virginia.”
In the west, Loudoun Valley High School’s racial population is 78% white, second to Woodgrove High School being 81.1%.
Despite the Loudoun County Hispanic population in the county being minimal, the county has worked to make sure that they bring awareness to the different cultures that populate the community.
“I feel very proud to be Hispanic and to have the opportunity to celebrate my culture and learn about my neighboring countries’ cultures,” Stapleton said. “Loudoun County is making more of an effort of putting the spotlight on each heritage month, and it’s nice to know that they’re doing that, and hopefully everyone will learn something new.”
that they bring awareness to the different cultures that populate the community.
“I feel very proud to be Hispanic and to have the opportunity to celebrate my culture and learn about my neighboring countries’ cultures,” Stapleton said. “Loudoun County is making more of an effort of putting the spotlight on each heritage month, and it’s nice to know that they’re doing that, and hopefully everyone will learn something new.”