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The Student News Site of Loudoun Valley High School

The Viking

The Student News Site of Loudoun Valley High School

The Viking

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As GenAI (or generative artificial intelligence) is continuing to expand to encompass all creative and factual horizons, students today have the world’s knowledge at their fingertips — and then some. We were the guinea pigs for the iPhone, and now our generation are the experimental subjects for artificial intelligence.

Read this debate between Avery Ramsey and Claire O`Connor at the link in our bio!

By Avery Ramsey and Claire O`Connor | Staff Reporters
Photo by Claire O`Connor
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Which do you prefer?

To watch the full video, click the link in our bio!

By Kenzie Farrey, Kate Miller, and Megan Fennelly
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Xolair: A New Advantage in the Fight Against Food Allergies

Image from @skippybrand on Instagram
Image from @skippybrand on Instagram

In the United States, about 3,000 people get hospitalized each year due to anaphylactic shock from food allergies — the most common being peanuts, milk, eggs, shellfish and tree nuts. Anaphylactic shock is a reaction to an allergen that causes blood pressure to drop and airways to narrow, which could be life-threatening if not immediately treated. 

Fortunately, a newly approved drug can help food allergies become more tolerable. 

Xolair was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Feb. 16. This is the first medication that’s been approved to help reduce allergic reactions to multiple different food allergies.

Xolair has also been approved to treat asthma triggered by allergies, chronic hives and chronic inflammatory sinus disease. 

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Xolair is not intended to be used during an allergic reaction, but taken repeatedly every few weeks to help reduce the risk of accidental exposure to food allergens.   

The drug works by stopping the immune system protein called immunoglobulin E (IgE) from binding with the IgE receptor. This will prevent the release of histamine and heparin, which are chemicals involved in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. 

In a trial, 68% of participants with peanut allergies could eat 2.5 peanuts without any symptoms after taking Xolair for 4-5 months. Despite this, those taking Xolair should still avoid the foods they are allergic to. 

The drug is taken via injection, commonly in the forearm. The most common side effect from the drug is fever and a reaction at the injection site, like redness, itching and swelling. 

The biotechnical companies that developed Xolar, Genentech and Novartis, warn that medication itself can also cause anaphylaxis, so be mindful in starting your first dose.

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